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Newsletters

The Dunbar Harbour Trust issues a regular newsletter with the latest soundbites from the website and announcements of upcoming events and activities. You can receive the newsletter in your email box by enterering your best email on the right of this page.

 

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On 4 December 2019 two men returned to their 9m privately-owned motor-cruiser ‘Diversion’, moored on the river Ouse in York. The diesel-fuelled heater had been leaking exhaust fumes into the boat’s cabin while they were ashore, It was a cold evening and the cabin heater had been left running while the two casualties were eating and drinking with friends in the city centre. Both men were overcome by a high level of carbon monoxide (CO) gas and died shortly after entering the boat’s cabin. There were 4 potential sources of carbon monoxide on board: The heater, the boat’s engine, a portable, petrol generator and a meths-fuelled cooker. The MAIB has investigated various fatal accidents where the above were identified as the source of this deadly toxic gas. https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/safety-warning-about-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-after-the-loss-of-2-lives-on-the-motor-cruiser-diversion

Safety Issues: no carbon monoxide alarm was fitted, the cabin heater installation had not been professionally checked and no servicing had been carried out. The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. Symptoms are often described as “flu-like.” If you breathe in a lot of CO it can make you pass out or kill you.

Carbon monoxide can also be a danger when a car engine is running in a garage, or a heater is in a confined space. Sufficient ventilation is good.

The following Scottish Government links provide additional guidance :- 

Photo credit: https://tworivers.insurance

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Have you spotted our cannon in place at its embrasure in the Battery, guarding the approaches to Belhaven Bay? Originally there were 16 cannon installed for defence against Napoleon’s anticipated invasion. The story goes that Edinburgh Castle ‘appropriated’ all our cannon when the emergency was over.

 

 

 

Credits for our cannon’s manufacture and installation:--

  • Bob Fleet -- wood wizardry and painting (Bob spent several unhealthy days turning the barrel on his garage’s lathe, enveloped in sawdust and creosote.)
  • Kenny Maule -- plans, ideas and resources
  • Paddy Crerar & Eric Robertson -- generous free wood supplies
  • Micky McLaughlin -- sturdy metal brackets
  • Pam Maule -- added muscle to help Bob & Kenny for a weighty installation on 16th Oct.

Our cannon is a toddler compared to Mons Meg:  https://www.edinburghcastle.scot/see-and-do/highlights/mons-meg

Mons Meg was once seen as cutting-edge military technology. The six-tonne siege gun could fire a 150kg gunstone for up to 3.2km (2 miles). She is named after the Belgian town where she was made. In 1460, James II had Mons Meg hauled 50 miles to the siege of Roxburgh Castle, 3 miles a day. But the unlucky king was killed there when another of his cannon exploded. Meg’s barrel finally burst in 1681. Dangerous things these cannon!!

Photo 1 by Kenny Maule: Bob makes final adjustments to the trajectory.

Photo 2 by Alasdair Swan: 'Young cannoneers in training'.  Click <<READ MORE>>

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These red rocket-flares were becoming out-of-date, so best to use them up for crew-practice.

Reminder to the public: setting off red rocket-flares is against the law, that’s why the RNLI can use hand-flares only when training.

Photo by Kenny Maule

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Did you watch ‘Saving Lives at Sea’ on BBC 2, 20th Oct. at 8pm? It’s still available on BBC’s iPlayer for 27 days til 15th Nov.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000np57/saving-lives-at-sea-series-5-episode-5?fbclid=IwAR0uiIx6fXd4ta8X4887XP8jq9nAEhs6CMbwF-PpWcPFy7EKMxRkXYj5wFY

Photo from the BBC.

User Rating: 5 / 5

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Dunbar Harbour Trust has installed a network of CCTV cameras around the harbour. The purpose of the CCTV is not just for crime prevention and monitoring the security of DHT premises and harbour users' property, it also provides additional safety cover for harbour users and visitors alike and enables the monitoring and adherence to DHT’s environmental policies.

Many thanks to Paul Ingram for researching, planning and commissioning this complex system, aided by Davy Brady, who had the task of making sure all the cameras had suitable power supplies.

The cameras themselves are by Hikvision, a leading manufacturer of CCTV equipment, chosen for their excellent low light capability and were installed by VWS from Cumbernauld, who have a wealth of experience installing CCTV equipment for local town and city councils and coincidentally the Seabird Centre in North Berwick, who have a camera in Dunbar looking at the Kittiwake colony that nests in the Castle walls at the western end of Victoria Harbour.

The CCTV is fully compliant with the current Data Protection legislation. So the area covered by the cameras is limited to Harbour Trust property, with any peripheral coverage of adjacent buildings being incidental and from such a distance that it does not interfere with the privacy of local residents.

The system is also registered with the Information Commissioners Office and details of the network and its coverage have been given to the local Police should it help them with any of their enquiries.

For more information Dunbar Harbour Trust can be contacted by email using: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Future plans for the network include a live web-cam feed from some of the cameras giving selected views of the main harbour and harbour entrance, which will be incorporated into the Trust’s web-site.

Photos by Kenny Maule:

photo 1: Technician installing,  photo 2. Click <<READ MORE>> below, for photo 2: Davy Brady (LHS) and Paul Ingram (RHS)

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Above, 'Davy Jones' is trying to attract your attention. He asks you to correctly dispose of your gloves and other nautical litter.

During the recent slipway extension, the small amount of mud excavated contained 100+ rubber gloves. These gloves are used mainly by fishermen and sometimes by yachtsmen. The mud also had plastic, glass and metal; some was obviously historical but I'm sure we can all try harder in future to please 'Davy Jones'.

Photo by Kenny Maule 

User Rating: 5 / 5

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Let's consider the poisonous problem of people idling their vehicles (and boat engines!) and we are all breathing in these noxious fumes. 

On Clean Air Day, Thursday Oct. 8th., you may see the Harbourmaster giving CAD-branded bandanas (face coverings) to people around the harbour who are idling their engines. Let's all support clean air and switch off our engines whenever possible, from now and forever, and encourage others to do the same. Children (and adults) will thank you.

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Most walkers have admired the 8 cygnets at the Biel Burn, tended by their parents. 

After about five to six weeks, the cygnets start to grow some proper feathers. These appear to first develop in the region of their growing wings, on their shoulders and then in the vicinity of their tail; after that, their belly and sides. Over the next few weeks, their entire body will moult the rest of their fluffy down and replace with feathers. The last place for the feathers to appear is on the head and neck.

This great photo was taken by Elaine Porteous. 

Click <<READ MORE>> for Kenny Maule's photo of a family dinner for 10! 

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Carioca, the late Bill Taylor's yacht, sailed from Dunbar for many years. She then sat on the 'hard' at Cromwell for 3 years, being recently sold to a new owner. The photo shows her being loaded onto a trailer: destination West Wales.

And in answer to your question: Carioca means an inhabitant of Rio de Janeiro, and is also the local dance.

Photo by Kenny Maule

Have any questions? Give us a call 01368 865 404

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